STRESSED? EXHAUSTED? OVERSTIMULATED? TRY YOGA NIDRA

Feel refreshed and relaxed in 20 minutes!

–and you don’t need to be a practiced yogi or meditator to enjoy the benefits.

You don’t even need to go to a class or pay a teacher with today’s audio downloads and smartphone apps.  All you need is a place where you won’t be interrupted for a short time and it can be done in any physical orientation (sitting, lying down, or even standing. Through guided imagery, breathing and body scanning, you submerge yourself into a restful, healing state that is a unique combination of alert awareness and deep relaxation-yoga nidra. Your brain waves slow to the alpha state or even theta, where you are able to tap into your subconscious mind and source of intuition, creativity and healing while remaining aware and conscious.

As you scan your body and explore sensations, emotions, and thought patterns you will be guided to move back and forth between feeling and witnessing, observing without responding, as your nervous system unwinds and comes into balance.

Through the integrative process that that balances the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, it quickly relieves anxiety and slows the fight or flight response. Stress hormones are reduced, blood pressure and heart rates decline and the metabolic system slows down.

Since Yoga Nidra has been shown to reduce levels of stress, hostility and anxiety in chronically-ill patients, veterans and school counselors it has been integrated into a program to treat vets with PTSD.

The benefits credited to Yoga Nidra practice include both psychological and physical-

  • Relief from insomnia
  • Reduction of depression and anxiety
  • Elimination of phobias
  • General improved well-being
  • Lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels
  • Improvement in immune system function
  • Pain relief
  • Asthma relief
  • Reduction in insulin dependence in diabetics

If Depression can Lead to Illness, What Causes Depression?

So much more to learn about the relationships between the mind, emotions and the body!

neurocomic7  Trauma image

Dr. Esther Sternberg’s “groundbreaking work on the link between the central nervous system and the immune system, (explored) how immune molecules made in the blood can trigger brain function that profoundly affects our emotions, (and) has revolutionized our understanding of the integrated being we call a human self.”

Despite that now it is mainstream to believe that our emotions, like depression, can cause illness in the physical body, “we need to ask what the molecules and nerve pathways are that cause depressing thoughts.”

The Balance Within: The Science Connecting Health and Emotions looks fascinating, I just ordered it. If you are interested too,  the latest post at Brain Pickings offers a good summary.

 

 

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy, by David D. Burns, MD

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy, by David D. Burns, MD

The good news is that anxiety, guilt, pessimism, procrastination, low self-esteem, and other “black holes” of depression can be cured without drugs. In Feeling Good, eminent psychiatrist, David D. Burns, M.D., outlines the remarkable, scientifically proven techniques that will immediately lift your spirits and help you develop a positive outlook on life. Now, in this updated edition, Dr. Burns adds an All-New Consumer′s Guide To Anti-depressant Drugs as well as a new introduction to help answer your questions about the many options available for treating depression.

Buy Book on Amazon

Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers

Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers: The Acclaimed Guide to Stress, Stress-related Diseases and Coping, by Robert M. Sapolsky

Renowned primatologist Robert Sapolsky offers a completely revised and updated edition of his most popular work, with nearly 90,000 copies in print

Now in a third edition, Robert M. Sapolsky’s acclaimed and successful Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcersfeatures new chapters on how stress affects sleep and addiction, as well as new insights into anxiety and personality disorder and the impact of spirituality on managing stress.

Buy Book on Amazon

 

 

Finally, a Bridge between Neuroscience and Psychoanalysis!

New research by  Francois Ansermet, a psychoanalyst, and Pierre Magistretti, a neuroscientist, shows how, rather than polar opposites, both fields are describing the same dynamics in the personality, behaviors, and motivation.

“The physical traces revealed in neuroplasticity correspond to a central tenet of psychoanalysis that life leaves its traces on the psyche as well.”

A common desire for my hypnosis clients is to be able to break through their subconscious resistance to change or a deep seated fear and anxiety. They are aware that something keeps holding them back, but aren’t sure what it is.

With the relatively new perspective of neuroplasticity, the knowledge that the “ever-changing brain is continually shaped by experience, . . . it means that we all have the capacity to change dysfunctional or unhealthy patterns.”

The Swiss researchers’ model suggests that therapy actually “resculpts” old patterns of thinking and reacting into healthier ways of being.

Psychiatrist Phillip Luloff stated that-

“It talks to the hope that one has that there can be change, that the brain is flexible and plastic. And that by the induction of just talk [analysis] they seem to be able show that there is a modification in the structure of the brain, which causes an evolution in perhaps the way the person functions and may lead to the healing in the troubled people with whom we work, including ourselves.”

Research into mind and brain could help patients with psychological disorders.