Kicking the Habit by Rewarding Yourself

Years ago I heard a parable of a guru who told his student that while he meditated he should never think about the RED MONKEY. Of course, although he had never thought of a red monkey before, that became the image that kept coming into his mind. Research has now shown that signs that prohibit smoking actually activate a craving to light up. Just think of all the negative messages that are everywhere intended to promote public health. In The Power of Habit: Why we do what we do in life and business, Charles Duhig states that habits can never be eradicated, they must be replaced by something that is equally rewarding.

Do you have a habit you want to kick? When you first feel the craving begin, pause a few minutes and get in touch with what you are really feeling. Are you just bored? annoyed? stressed? lonely? Whatever you are reaching for is what you use to mask what you truly want. Once you have identified what you are used to masking, the next step is to make a list of other ways to satisfy or remedy the uncomfortable emotion. Will power is rarely strong enough to create a new pattern. Once you have figured out other ways to relieve stress, or boredom, or loneliness and made them readily available in your schedule and surroundings, you just might find that you are naturally smoking less, exercising more, and enjoying life more fully.

THOU SHALT NOT SAY “NO” TO YOURSELF.

SAY “YES” TO LIFE!


Hypnosis-Myths and Misconceptions

For many of us, our only exposure to hypnosis is what is shown on TV, just an act for entertainment purposes. It actually is an effective tool for an individual to create change at a very profound level, where one’s own mind is actively engaged.

Here is a 3-minute clip of Dr. Steven Gurgevich, a psychologist specializing in Mind-Body Medicine and the author of “Hypnosis House Call, answering some commonly asked questions about the experience of hypnosis.

Myths and Misconceptions about Hypnosis

Hypnosis and Change

The simplest answer to the question is simply:  Because it works.

When we talk to a therapist in a fully alert and conscious state, we may be able to reason and analyze in ways that are important for understanding the implications of what we do.

But even when we do understand, change rarely comes easy.

We cannot change, because, on some level, we are addicted.

We are addicted to the same patterns, the same neurochemicals, the same behaviors.  Hindus call this addiction “karma.”  The Gnostics called it “sin.”

Any way you look at it, knowledge alone does not bring freedom.

Why is this the case?

Because our addictions are based on our experiences.  At some point in our past we experienced something that was so intense that we bottled up the experience and brought it inside of ourselves.  We allowed this experience to become foundational for all of our future emotional responses.

This is the karmic “drop” that resides insides of us, ready to be awakened at any moment to cause us to react.  For Sigmund Freud, this entailed a drive to endlessly repeat the events and responses that are most traumatic to us.  At some points in his writing he refers to it as the “Death Drive.”

In order to counter an experience one needs to have another experience in return.

It is not enough to reason in the state of consciousness in which we file papers or discuss the news.

Hypnosis allows us to revisit the sources of our addictions in a state of emotional intensity.  With all of our senses engaged, it becomes possible for our new experience (the desire for freedom) to override the old.

Often hypnosis brings transformation in a single session.